Soil Depth and Plant Selection

Minimum soil depth for plant growth is a frequent subject of discussion of late and while you cannot search The Plantium based upon soil depth, we thought we’d gather some information to assist in your criteria based plant designs!

Let’s first look at the question at hand. As designers and installers we are asked to create landscapes in all sorts of conditions. Often these conditions are challenging and not necessarily conditions that plants might face in their natural environments. That said, we have all seen these images at some point in our lives…. the beautiful and resilient plant that appears to be growing happily, in what appears to be NO soil depth AT ALL!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For those looking for answers regarding bed construction and just soil depth in general, let’s send you to one of our Plantium brands for some fantastic basic information regarding bed construction in the field.

https://www.provenwinners.com/learn/make-your-bed

Soil depth for OPTIMAL plant growth in more challenging situations such as green roof conditions, large planters, tree wells, etc. is dependent on four main factors. These factors are proper drainage, proper plant selection, plant longevity, and soil depth to plant height ratio. We’ll discuss these factors in this order because the very last issue you should be considering in your plant design is soil depth. If you have not addressed the first three issues in your bed design then regardless of soil depth, plants will not thrive.

Proper Drainage

Whether your planting bed is in the lawn, green roof or contained planters, proper drainage is crucial. While certain plants can survive inundation in a natural setting, standing water or improper drainage will QUICKLY de-oxygenate and compact the soil in contained situations and kill the plants. There are many ways to tackle drainage and all are dependent on the design situation. Working closely with the horticulture team is the best way to find an effective drainage solution.

Proper Plant Selection

Let’s look at those tough little plants growing in the cracks and crevasses! You need to keep in mind the type of plant you are specifying when dealing with challenging planting situations. Plants that grow in these conditions in the natural world tend to be tough, resilient, vigorous, and drought tolerant plants. If you have all the right soil and bed conditions but choose more sensitive plants, it is likely that those plants will struggle. Also, remember that as the soil profile for any plant is constrained so will the plant’s natural habit be constrained. Street trees planted in minimum soil volumes will never reach the full mature height or width that they would under optimal growing conditions.

 

 

Plant Longevity

Planting designs are being designed and installed with a maximum 20 year life span. A controversial statement, perhaps, so feel free to challenge it! It appears long gone are the days of an Olmsteadian landscape that appreciates with time and just barely reaches its full glory at 20 years. Here at The Plantium we vehemently disagree with this trend and firmly believe that criteria based plant selection can reverse this trend. Better plant choices! We’d love to hear your comments on this issue!

All that said, green roof and enclosed planter situations pose different challenges. Small planters and shallow green roof systems need very carefully management to maintain soil health and ultimately plant health. The shallower the soil profile the more quickly that soil will be depleted of nutrients and micro-organisms crucial to the plant’s health. If a refresh of the plant material (and soil) is planned over time, then shallower soil profiles can be a great fit. If the design contemplates trees and shrubs that are intended to grow to maturity over time, then a more significant soil depth should be considered.

Soil Depth

On to the question at hand. Let’s simplify the soil depth for optimal plant growth under container type situations into the following categories. Again, exact soil depth is probably debatable by many so we welcome other thoughts from our expert crowd!

Plant Type Plant Height Minimum Soil Depth
Annuals Any 3”
Turf Grass NA 4” (3” in warm climates)
Perennials <8” 4” (3” in warm climates)
Perennials 8”-16” 6”-8”
Perennials/ Ornamental Grasses/ Shrubs 16”-24” 12”-18”
Perennials/ Ornamental Grasses/ Shrubs 2’-6’ 24”
Shrubs/ Small Trees >6’ 3’ Minimum (should consider overall volume as well)
Trees All Should be calculated on overall volume for each tree and not just soil depth

 

Maintenance

Lastly, on-going maintenance is the greatest issue facing these planting designs. Over-watering is perhaps the most frequent maintenance faux pas committed against our container plants. Carefully working with the maintenance team is critical to head off this issue early on.

Happy Planting Y’all!

 

Designing with Bulbs

We’ve all read some great articles about designing with bulbs (and corms) so why not keep the discussion going? Designing with bulbs can be daunting. Visiting the botanic gardens in spring nearly blinds us with the glory of huge swaths of spring bulbs. Vast beds of daffodils, crocus and tulips are the sure sign that spring has sprung. A bed of crocus dusted with snow is an iconic image of early spring. Now let’s focus our attention on some other aspects of designing with bulbs, year-round interest and designing to specific bloom heights.

5177_WPFL_Eremurus-himalaicus-WMC_001Dahlia 'XXL Veracruz' AZTEC

The opportunities presented by designing with bulbs can be taken advantage of year-round with a little planning and great execution. Gladiolus and Dahlias can bring in a huge color punch during the mid-summer to late summer in warmer climates and similarly Allium and Autumn Crocus in colder climates. Similarly, lilies can provide a tremendous amount of foliar interest in the early summer months and then finish the season off with splendid color in late summer and even through the fall. The first step is to sort through the vast array of choices in bulbs and corms and remember what you are trying to achieve. Here a sampling of a season-long list for a garden in zone 6a, that’s scented, and attracts bees, hummingbirds, and butterflies. This short list from The Plantium yields plenty of choices to keep you thinking about designing with bulbs all season long! There are so many more to choose from!

Bulb Flowering Season

The next consideration is careful planning around bloom height. This same list now includes plant (foliar) height vs. actual bloom height. Not planning for the bloom height of late blooming bulbs is a common mistake. Some height variations will be minimal but some can be more than a foot or even up to 4’! Check out the Foxtail Lily. Many of these bulbs are not known for lush foliage so you can place them further back in the garden (than you might normally based solely on foliar height) with other perennials or shrubs around them. This leaves their bloom to surprise us when the time is right!

Bulb Flower Heights

Sourcing Plants – New Plant Availability Feature (beta)

Sourcing plants is about to be easier than ever!

UPDATED 5/1/17

Just choose your state and see all of The Plantium’s participating nurseries. Don’t see your favorite nursery? Just complete the form and get their information on our site as soon as possible! You can now also export existing plant lists as a spreadsheet, including availability.

Colorado Nurseries

Plant availability is live on The Plantium. Do you want to sign up a nursery that you frequently go to for plant material? Send them this link. Fill out the quick easy form and we can list that nursery’s stock for FREE! ENJOY!

For Nurseries

Plant Availability (beta) is LIVE! Sourcing plants can be the most disheartening part of planting design.  As a landscape architect I cannot think of anything more frustrating than spending hours choosing just the right plants for a project only to have my contractor or nursery supplier come back and tell me they cannot find half of what I specified. It drives me crazy!

That is why we are so excited to launch the new Plantium availability feature (beta) in Colorado, Utah and beyond. Landscape professionals in these states will soon be able to search for great plants, make lists, evaluate their designs AND locate those plants at nearby nurseries. While only in beta version right now, we are thrilled to make finding plants just a little bit easier. This plant availability feature will be live in the coming weeks. Start your free one month trial now, and take advantage of your free web training session so you can be ready to take full advantage of this new time saver as soon as it hits the primetime!

Thanks and Happy Plant Hunting!

By Heather Henry, President and CEO of The Plantium

Understanding Nursery Stock Sizes

It’s time to build your plant lists…. And there’s one thing to remember. Size matters! But understanding and deciphering standard nursery stock sizes can be like trying to find your way out of an Iowa cornfield. You’re bound to get lost a few times. Everyone calls out nursery stock sizes differently. Gallons, flat size, tree height, or caliper have all appeared in our plant lists. But depending on your familiarity with the nursery industry, you may not know that there is a continuously updated national standard on how to spec nursery stock sizes!

When writing this blog, I set out to include a nice handy, dandy all-purpose cheat sheet for our landscape professionals but it turns out that is easier said than done! Instead, this article provides a brief overview of the standard and can get you started on the right path to learning more for the next time you specify plants. We cannot promise that your suppliers will be following this standard to the number and letter, but if you stay familiar with the standards you will be much more likely to specify the nursery stock sizes that are available.

Specifying the Right Sizes Takes Knowledge

Specifying the Right Sizes Takes Knowledge

Called the American Standard for Nursery Stock, this national standard is published and maintained by AmericanHort, which is a somewhat recently formed consolidation of the American Nursery & Landscape Association and OFA—The Association of Horticultural Professionals.

According to AmericanHort, “The purpose of the American Standard for Nursery Stock … is to provide buyers and sellers of nursery stock with a common terminology, a ‘single language,’ in order to facilitate commercial transactions involving nursery stock. For instance, the Standard establishes common techniques for (a) measuring plants, (b) specifying and stating the size of plants, (c) determining the proper relationship between height and caliper, or height and width, and (d) determining whether a root ball or container is large enough for a particular size plant.”

The organization has been publishing this nursery standard since 1923, and it was adopted as a national standard in 1949 (ANSI Z60.1-2014). The most recent revision to the standard was published in 2014, and is available free from AmericanHort HERE. Use of this standard when growing and specifying plants is voluntary, but it is widely accepted and often referenced in standard specification sections. Using the standard has many benefits for designers and contractors, not the least of which is simplifying the procurement and acceptance processes by relying on clear pre-defined standards for quality and size of nursery stock.

The complete standard may be a daunting 109 pages but it is a surprisingly easy read, and provides in-depth, but digestible information. Below are a few key points from the American Standard for Nursery Stock you may find helpful (along with a cheat sheet to get you to the appropriate tables in the larger document). However, we would HIGHLY recommend reading through the whole standard and having a copy handy. It truly provides an amazing wealth of info (there’s a great section on identifying unacceptable co-dominant leaders – a problem I’ve had first hand issues with!). This resource also provides all the information necessary when accepting or rejecting plant material that shows up at your site!

 General Standards for Nursery Stock Sizes:

  • Specifications must include plant size by caliper, height or width appropriate to the plant type.
  • Certain plants may be specified by container size (see below). ALL others should be specified with caliper, height or width.
  • Typically, plant size specifications should include only the minimum allowable plant size in that interval. In other words, if you specify a 2.5 in. caliper Type 1 shade tree you may get a tree anywhere up to a 3 in caliper because it references the 2.5 to 3 inch range for that type of tree. As long as you specify the minimum, you know you will not get a SMALLER tree.
  • Caliper is always measured six inches above ground or soil level for trees less than 4.5” caliper, and 12 inches above the ground for 4.5” or larger.

General Standards for Containers:

  • These are generally the only plants to specify by container size
    • Herbaceous perennials
    • Non-winter-hardy shrubs
    • Ornamental grasses
    • Groundcovers
    • Vines
  • Containers marketed and sold with a # designation must have volumes within the ranges shown in the ANSI standard in order to comply
  • Container classes #1 through #100 include the volume of a container that, if such a container were manufactured, would hold the equivalent number of gallons as the container class number. #1 = one gallon; #5 = five gallon and so on.
  • Nursery stock specifications that reference only an imperial volume measurement, such as “quarts” or “gallons,” are not in accordance with the Standard. I can tell you that our plant lists have gotten that WRONG for years!!
  • The SP designation refers to ‘small plant’ containers. #SP4, for example, is a 4 inch container, or “quart” container. This designation goes from #SP1 – #SP5 and should reference square or round.
  • Container grown nursery stock shall have a well-established root system reaching the sides of the container to maintain a firm ball, but shall not have excessive root growth encircling the inside of the container (the same holds true for roots in ball and burlap!).

 

Root Bound

Container Growth Gone Wrong – Root Bound Tree

Tree B&B

When Done Right – A Thing of Beauty

 

Shade and Flowering Trees:

  • There are FOUR types of shade and flowering trees identified in the standard with the following associated specifications tables
    • Type 1 – Page 15-16
    • Type 2 – Page 17
    • Type 3 – Page 19
    • Type 4 – Page 21
    • Multi-stem and Shrub Form Trees – Page 24
  • Multi-stem tree specifications should include a minimum number of stems. If none is specified, 3 will be assumed.

Deciduous Shrubs:

  • There are THREE types of deciduous shrubs identified in the standard with associated specifications
    • Type 0 – Page 28
    • Type 1 – Page 28
    • Type 2 – Page 29
    • Type 3 – Page 30
  • Plants may not meet plant size specification or minimum number of canes at time of shipment at certain times of the year, but would be expected to reach the plant size specification and minimum number of canes during the first growing season after shipment.

Coniferous Evergreens:

  • There are SIX types of Coniferous Evergreens identified in the standard with associated specifications
    • Type 1 – Page 32
    • Type 2 – Page 33
    • Type 3 – Page 34
    • Type 4 – Page 36
    • Type 5 – Page 38
    • Type 6 – Page 40
  • Coniferous evergreens will also be described by their shearing:
    • Natural: (showing the form natural for the species)
    • Semi Sheared (sheared when plant is young to maintain symmetrical shape)
    • Sheared (pruned regularly to retain a symmetrical shape)
    • Altered Form (Can you say POODLED!!)

Broadleaf Evergreens:

  • There are SIX types of Coniferous Evergreens identified in the standard with associated specifications
    • Type 1 – Page 42
    • Type 2 – Page 44
    • Type 3 – Page 46
    • Type 4 – Page 48
    • Type 5 – Page 50
    • Type 6 – Page 52

Additional information in the standard provides specs for young plants, roses, palms (and other bare root stock), fruit trees, bulbs, corms/ tubers, and understock/seedling trees and shrubs.

Now, armed with this great information, you can confidently go forth and specify!

Also, check out these other great articles regarding considerations on transplant size:

https://www.michigan.gov/documents/dnr/Influence_of_Tree_Size_on_Transplant_Establishment_277656_7.pdf

http://www.ncufc.org/uploads/Tree_Establishment_A_Review_of_Some_of_the_Factors_(Struve_2009).pdf

The Plantium: The Beginning

It’s time to do a planting design. Eyes roll. There’s a lot of sighing. It is not pretty.

After spending hours on the design process for the hardscape somehow we continually short-change the plant design. Instead of supporting and becoming integral to our designs, it lingered behind, relegated to the last 10% of the fee (if we were lucky) and constantly approached with trepidation and angst. Why would this critical component of our landscape profession, a profession with a rich history of close and careful integration of hard and soft elements, be left to wither (no pun intended) at the end of the design process? Because each plant design began with the arduous task of combing through some existing plant lists buried in the electronic files of the server’s nether regions, then we’d pull up six websites and spread out a dozen print references. We’d try to choose plants that would be successful under the project’s environmental and design conditions. Once chosen we’d spend hours combing for imagery and creating boards and graphs that might explain this elusive effort of plant design to clients generally unversed in even basic plant knowledge. All this effort to then learn these plants are not even available for purchase commercially.

The Plantium Debuts at ASLA 2015

The Plantium Debuts at ASLA 2015

The Plantium founders having way too much fun.

The Plantium founders having way too much fun.

Did you also know some of our top landscape architecture programs around the country are dropping plant identification and plant design classes all together? So, even our young staff was entering the profession grossly underdeveloped in the area of plant design.

IF we were fortunate to have a go-to ‘plant person’ in house or at least nearby he/ she would bust out their ‘tried and true’ plants that had been used dozens of times before. Yet, somehow, we continued to be shocked when our plant designs all started to look the same! The chasm between softscape and hardscape seems destined to grow ever larger… until now. Where was our ability to be as creative in our plant selections as we were in our hardscape designs? We needed a solution. We needed a place that would aggregate all this plant information into one consolidated source and help us quickly and easily evaluate plants that met ever evolving project design challenges.

So was born The Plantium. As founders we wanted to solve for our own ever growing frustrations. Launched in Colorado with humble beginnings by four founders, three landscape professionals and one software developer, The Plantium will electronically organize and revolutionize the entire process of plant searching, management, purchasing and maintenance. One step at a time we will ‘change the way the world sees plants’.

We are thrilled to be releasing new features and critical bug fixes at the beginning of the year that will be a major step forward in our software’s functionality. Sign up now for a free trial or drop us your email address and we’ll make sure you get a notification when The Plantium 1.0 has on its ‘Sunday best’! Stay tuned to this blog in the future to meet the founders individually as well as hear a little more about The Plantium. We look forward to getting to know you!

https://app.theplantium.com/register