Top Five Landscape Trends of 2018

A great article on the top five landscape trends of 2018 from the NALP. Check out this article and then you’ll notice that The Plantium can help you with ALL FIVE TRENDS! Awesome!

http://www.greenindustrypros.com/news/12393671/experiential-and-eco-friendly-the-top-five-landscape-trends-of-2018

1. Experiential Landscape Design

With the plant filter criteria in The Plantium, designers can now find specific themes for garden and planting spaces that trigger and enhance the user experience. Would you like to design an entirely scented garden along the office campus footpath? Or create a bird and bee sanctuary outside a client’s kitchen window? With The Plantium, intricate plant criteria can be considered side-by-side with fundamental environmental criteria to design gardens and plantings with greater meaning and experience than ever before. You can even make sure you’ll find those plants at area wholesale nurseries.

2. Climate-Cognizant Landscaping

The Plantium’s vision statement is ‘Changing the way the world sees plants’. When we think about changing climates and resilient landscapes understanding plants, their environments, prioritizing their uses, capturing data regarding the success and failures of plants in the cultivated landscape, and gathering data regarding plant availability are just a few crucial pieces in the web of designing and procuring plants that are good choices for each unique climate. Data gathered by The Plantium allows growers and plant propagators to better understand what plants are being specified in what areas of the country and even what criteria are important to landscape professionals.

3. An Emphasis on Water Management and Conservation

No matter where you are in the country, the word drought has entered the conversation at one point or another. Water, both quality and quantity, is our most precious resource at the greatest risk as we cope with a changing climate. As landscape professionals we are charged with taking a HUGE leadership role in the stewardship of this resource. Educating ourselves on beautifully executed xeric designs, educating our clients on what xeric landscapes really are, and educating growers on the plants we need to accomplish superb water-wise landscapes are important aspects of this landscape trend. Tools like The Plantium that can combine great aesthetic plant choices with water-wise considerations will be critical to the forward progress of this trend.

4. Enhanced Equipment and Technology

Why yes, landscape professionals are DEFINITELY integrating more technology (like THE PLANTIUM!) into their businesses and work. Software like The Plantium has the ability to capture and disseminate data regarding the best plant choices for different climates, assisting growers and wholesalers make good choices in the plants they introduce and grow each year. It helps landscape professionals educate their clients regarding their plant choices. Like many technological tools, it also simply helps professionals do what they do, FASTER. Find plants, organize planting projects, and evaluate designs in the blink of an eye. There’s a reason why 85% of the professionals that view a demo of our software buy it!

5. Plants in Playful Colors and Patterns

How do you best integrate year round whimsy and color into the garden? How do you purposefully combine the ultra-violets that are the trend for 2018 with fantastic complementing colors and playful leaf interest? How do you keep track of these all these aesthetic characteristics and not lose site of the other environmental aspects of the garden? The Plantium. That’s how.

Thanks for the great article NALP. https://www.landscapeprofessionals.org/

Plantium Search Results

 

Using Denitrifying Plants in the Landscape

Turns out we have an addiction in this country. “Call it the nitrogen fix. It is like a drug mainlined into the planet’s ecosystems, suffusing every cell, every pore — including our own bodies.”1 In response, some jurisdictions (apparently finding dealing with addiction at the source – i.e. agriculture, wastewater, feed lots, poor landscape practices, etc. too difficult) are requiring the end user of non-potable reclaimed effluent to utilize only denitrifying plants in the landscape. Their theory being that if the ornamental plants can take up the nitrogen, then problem solved.

This discussion of overabundance of nitrogen in our water and soil could get really scientific, really fast (and unfortunately make for very dry reading) so instead I’m going to keep things pretty simple and straightforward and provide some great resources for seeking additional information.

The nitrogen problem. “Over the last century, the intensive use of chemical fertilizers has saturated the Earth’s soils and waters with nitrogen. Now scientists are warning that we must move quickly to revolutionize agricultural systems and greatly reduce the amount of nitrogen we put into the planet’s ecosystems.”1 Excessive nitrogen leaches into waterways, feeds algal blooms and contributes to eutrophication of water systems….. effectively starving plant and aquatic life of oxygen. It can even starve our children of oxygen, known as Blue Baby Syndrome, as a result of nitrogen contaminated drinking water.

The good news. Nitrogen is an inorganic compound which, unlike other macronutrients, can be turned to gas and released into the atmosphere. More good news. This means that the use of denitrifying plants can be addressed via phytometabolism in a relatively short period of time and presents good opportunities for field application.2 “Since all plants use nitrogen and support denitrifying bacteria, any kind of plant can provide some form of nitrogen remediation from soils and water. However, the method that provides the quickest remediation tends to be a system that includes plants with very high growth rates and evapotranspiration rates. Nitrogen is used up quickly, or the plant acts like a large reactor, priming the soil bacteria for speedy conversion of the nitrogen into a gas. Plants species that produce a lot of biomass have been those most successfully used in studies to remove high levels of nitrogen in soils and groundwater.”3 Some would then argue for the use of bluegrass and other fast growing turf, but studies have shown that a mixed species landscape will produce a more diverse microbial soil, and therefore denitrify faster via plants AND bacteria.

Finding the right plants. While in no way an exhaustive list, the book Phyto: Principles and resources for site remediation and landscape design, suggests a brief list of high biomass plants such as Bambuseae, Brassica juncea, Brassica napas, Cannabis sativa, Linum usitatissimum, Panicum virgatum, Populus, Salix and Sorghum. Additionally, some high evapotranspiration-rate plants include Alnus, Betula, Eucalyptus, Fraxinus, Populus, Salix, Sarcobatus vermiculatus and Taxodium distichum. Again, while not an exhaustive list one thing to note is that these tend to be high water use species. In a large scale remediation setting this is desirable (because you are purposefully applying large amounts of contaminated water), however, it tends to fly in the face of end user goals in the ornamental landscape that are working hard to reduce overall water consumption.

Unfortunately, it would seem that municipalities, especially in drought plagued areas trying to encourage water reuse, may end up further discouraging effluent reuse with these unnecessary regulations and may find themselves dealing with unintended consequences, such as forcing the use of plants that require even more water to both thrive and denitrify the soil. It is clearly a discussion worth continuing.

 

I’d like to thank Kate Kennen for the amazing information gathered from her book for this article. Kate is always an inspiration and this book is an INCREDIBLE resource for all practical applications, large or small, for phytoremediation and productive landscapes. It is a must read!

Find Kate here….  http://offshootsinc.com/

Find her book here…. https://www.amazon.com/Phyto-Principles-Resources-Remediation-Landscape/dp/0415814154

  1. Fred Pearce. Copyright 2009. http://e360.yale.edu/mobile/feature.msp?id=2207
  2. Kate Kennen and Niall Kirkwood, Phyto: Principles and resources for site remediation and landscape design. Routledge, 2015. Figure 3.1, Page 63
  3. Page 128

Urban Horticulture in a Capital Place: The National Botanic Garden

By, Arabella Beavers, Busy Beavers Gardening. Why would urban horticulture be important to The Plantium roving gardener? As our climate changes, as gardeners our ability to respond to these changes in a sustainable manner has to stay current and relevant. Urban horticulture is the study of the relationship between plants and the urban environment. It focuses on the functional use of horticulture so as to maintain and improve the surrounding urban area.[1] Staying current with the sustainability aspects of horticulture and gardening means being inspired by its new trends.

My inspiration this spring came from our nation’s capital and the gardens of Washington, DC. An amazing tribute to the history of gardens and an inspiration to the future of sustainability in urban horticulture the National Botanic Garden can’t help but stir the gardener’s imagination.

I was fortunate enough to visit Washington, DC and although the weather was a little inclement for spring, I was so delighted to find such spectacular gardens in our nation’s capital. From urban gardens along the city streets to sculpture gardens and the glory that is housed in the National Botanic Gardens – this city definitely is in touch with its green side. The United States Botanic Garden (USBG) is a botanic garden on the grounds of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., near Garfield Circle. The Botanic Garden is supervised by the Congress through the Architect of the Capitol, who is responsible for maintaining the grounds of the United States Capitol. The USBG is open every day of the year, including federal holidays. It is the oldest continually operating botanic garden in the United States.

USBG Entrance

The Courtyard Entrance, National Botanic Garden

 

Here’s a little history on this historic garden. The garden began as the Botanical Garden of the Columbian Institute but became the United States Botanic Garden in 1850, thirteen years after the demise of the institute. In 1867, Congress provided money for the construction of the first greenhouses. Constructed by the Architect of the Capitol in 1933, this historic Lord & Burnham greenhouse contains two courtyard gardens and 10 garden rooms under glass, totaling 28,944 square feet of growing space. Several historic trees stood on the site including the Crittenden Oak which marks the spot where John J. Crittenden made an address in an effort to avert the Civil War. Others included the Beck-Washington Elm which was a scion of an elm earlier planted by Washington himself. There was also a plane tree which Thaddeus Stevens brought from the Vale of Cashmere, a sycamore planted by Senator Daniel Voorhees, a Chinese oak from the grave of Confucius, two cedars of Lebanon, and several others that have historic associations.

The Bartholdi Fountain, the work of Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, the same sculptor who designed the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor stood in a central site in the gardens, however, it was placed in storage for several years to make way for the memorial to General Meade, the hero of Gettysburg.

The garden “was formally placed under the jurisdiction of the Joint Committee on the Library of Congress in 1856 and has been administered through the Office of the Architect of the Capitol since 1934. The Architect of the Capitol has served as Acting Director of the United States Botanic Garden and is responsible for the maintenance and operation of the Garden and for any construction, changes, or improvements made.” [2]

Today, the United States Botanic Garden is home to almost 10,000 living specimens, some of them over 165 years old.

USBG and Capital Dome

The National Botanic Gardens with Capital Dome Behind

Enough with the history…. Here’s my camera eye view of the experience that I had at the USBG on that wonderful ‘April Showers’ day…..
Nestled Within the shadows of The Capitol – currently under a state of repair, this lush garden was displaying its last flush of spring bulbs and beginning to prepare for a perennial push. With some exceptional displays of roses, iris and flowering bushes such as fragrant aballia. I was so excited to see this wonderful array – especially since it was still snowing back in Colorado!

Rose in USBG

Rose Specimen in the Rose Garden

The irises were particularly beautiful at this time of year, with the Iris tectorum ‘Alba’ being stunning in white and another favorite, the traditional bearded iris, in an array of colors that reminded me of a Monet masterpiece I had just seen in the National Gallery. There was even an iris called the red velvet Elvis iris, sadly not yet in bloom!! While plants such as the Iris tectorum can be hard to find, think about more common ones such as the Iris ‘Immortality’ to achieve the pure beauty of the white iris. https://shar.es/1l6uCg

Iris Specimen in NBG

Blooming Iris at USBG

Iris in Bloom

One of the things I loved so much was that they had many specimen plants – one of my particular favorites was this daisy – the Erigeron pulchellus var. pulchellus ‘Lynnhaven Carpet’, a wondrous woodland plant.

Erigeron pulchellus var. pulchellus 'Lynnhaven Carpet'

Erigeron Specimen

Continuing my walk through, I was particularly impressed by their water gardens with a contemporary gazebo and lovely plantings. It was alive with birds and a pair of mallards taking a bath in the shallow ponds. Examples of water grasses, lilies and water iris were just stunning.

Water garden 2 NBG

The Water Gardens, USBG

The Water Gardens, National Botanic Garden

Moving on through this delightful place, I was getting a soaking of my own as it was turning out to be a wet English type day – so I headed toward the greenhouse conservatory to see what I could find in there. Boy was I in for a colorful treat! It was like entering Aladdin’s cave, magical hothouse full of blooms and delights for the garden enthusiast.
The formal ponds within the main entrance are bedazzling – azure pools surrounded by bright pink azalea’s, orange orchids and surrounded by citrus trees – it was like a mirage. But this is a real garden and its microclimate creates the perfect temperature and humidity for the array or orchids and bromeliads clinging to the exotic trees they call home. At the end of each pool was an extraordinary living wall that contained more orchids –  a tropical display that was stunning to me.

Water Garden_USBG

Indoor Formal Water Gardens

Orchids 2 NBG Orchids_Closeup 2 NBG

Orchids in the Tropical Garden

Orchids in the Tropical Garden

 

As you can see from these close up images, these are not the orchids you buy at the supermarket!!

The national botanic garden houses many specialized gardens with displays including a Mediterranean garden, tropical gardens, desert gardens, tundra and a children’s play garden – something for everyone.  What I liked about it the most was that it had such a diversity of plantings.  Plants that we all know and love and use regularly in our gardens, such as lavender, to really unusual varieties that have been nurtured from far off lands form these magnificent displays.

 

 

Med Garden at USBG

Mediterranean Garden in the Conservatory

This really is a spectacular place and somewhere that I would love to return.  Seeing these magnificent displays not only left me wondering about the hundreds of hours of maintenance these gardens would take – but also how inspired I now am to travel and explore gardens all over the world. The challenge of seeing these plants in their natural environment, just as nature intended, then translating them to the urban horticultural environment is a challenge I am ready to take.

I leave you with some interesting facts and more information – next time you are in DC make sure not to miss these glorious gardens.

https://www.usbg.gov/

Happy Planting!

Arabella Beavers, Busy Beavers Gardening

https://www.facebook.com/Busy-Beavers-Gardening-LLC-201131763257382/?fref=ts

Aspen, Colorado

©ARABELLA BEAVERS, 2016

  1. Tukey, HB Jr. (1983). “Urban horticulture: horticulture for populated areas”.HortScience: 11–13.
  2. https://www.usbg.gov/brief-history-us-botanic-garden

Pick Plants with Emotional Intelligence

Selecting the right plants for a design regularly becomes one of the most time consuming portions of a design project for me.  Like all designers, I have my list of go-to plants; the tried-and-true plants that thrive and provide a lot of visual interest.  But every landscape calls for unique plants, whether for a unique function or to highlight a specific spot.  When you are trying to pick plants…. those few perfect plants, from the thousands of possibilities, it is easy to have time fly by and, before you know it, you have skipped lunch (maybe even dinner) and still have to select more plants.

Of course, the more conditions you add to a specific selection, potentially the more amount of time it takes to make the right choice.  This is especially true when you are working in less familiar territory.  If you need a Mediterranean garden, I can rattle off a list of plants a mile long that would fit.  But what about when that garden is going to be located adjacent to a disused rail line, and I need plants that will help detoxify the soil in addition to looking great?

This is where The Plantium will step in.  For the last couple of months I have been speaking with landscape architects and designers, environmental planners, urban planners, conservationists, and many others, asking the question: What environmental factors impacting plants do you regularly consider?  All of these responses are being used by The Plantium to improve their database of plants so that the selection process will be easier, no matter the situation.  So when you need to know what plants will thrive along a disused railroad track, you can search for plants that are tolerant to copper, arsenic, and petroleum products, three of the most common pollutants along rail lines.

What are some of the most common environmental factors design professionals consider when selecting plants?  There are the apparent ones (and ones that The Plantium already supports) such as sun exposure, water requirements, and soil conditions.  Some of the other commonly mentioned factors were:

  • High wind conditions
  • Heavy metal tolerance
  • Pollution remediation
  • Intermittent water inundation
  • Nitrogen and phosphorous uptake
  • Air pollution tolerance
  • Early establishers in disturbed landscapes
  • High UV radiation tolerance
  • Pine needle and leaf-litter tolerance
  • And many others

Some of these factors are certainly specialized to specific design sectors, but others are ones that designers need to deal with on a regular basis.  For instance, in Northern Utah we receive approximately 15% more UV radiation than at lower altitudes.  Several plants have foliage damage at our elevation if they are planted in the direct sun.  This is just one example of why I am excited to see these factors added to The Plantium’s database.  Look for that in future updates!  Until then, happy planting!

Check out the entire white paper. CLICK HERE

Guest Author:

Benjamin George, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning
Utah State University